Tips for New Registered Nurses

Tips for New Registered Nurses

Starting a new job can be scary, and starting your first day as a registered nurse can be even scarier! Remember that you've graduated from nursing school and passed the NCLEX-RN -- you can do it! Watch this video as Ashley Adkins of AshleyAdkins, RN helps you through those first 6 months as a registered nurse.

Tips for New Registered Nurses

Starting a new job can be scary, and starting your first day as a registered nurse can be even scarier! Remember that you’ve graduated from nursing school and passed the NCLEX-RN — you can do it! Watch this video as Ashley Adkins of AshleyAdkins, RN helps you through those first 6 months as a registered nurse.

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    Hey guys. I’m Ashley Adkins from the nursing YouTube channel, Ashley Atkins RN, and also my website, AshleyAdkins.org, and I have partnered with Nursing.org to bring this video to you guys all about how to survive your first six months of being a registered nurse.

    So just a little background information for you all. I graduated from nursing school with my Bachelor’s Degree in August of 2015 and have been working as a nurse since September of 2015. So it’s been about six months now and so I have accumulated
    some tips for you guys on how to survive your first six months of being a new grad nurse.

    So you probably have all heard the phrase, that nurses eat their young. And you’re probably wondering, is this really true? Do they really do that?

    Well you know what, it depends.

    Show Full Transcript

    And I think that in most hospitals you really have to prove yourself to the more experienced nurses, especially when you’re a new grad nurse. And so how you do that is by number one, asking questions.

    As a new grad nurse you have to ask questions. A nurse that is silent, that does not ask questions, is a dangerous nurse.

    And even nurses that have 40 years of experience don’t know everything and still should be asking questions. So know that it is OK to ask questions. It is OK to not know everything. And if you ask questions that at least shows that you’re engaged and that you’re willing to learn and that you are not afraid to admit when you don’t know something.

    My next tip for surviving the first six months of being a new grad nurse is to take time for yourself.

    It is so easy to get wrapped up in the emotions and the craziness of being a new grad nurse. And it is stressful to start off as a nurse because you feel like you’re lost at times and you don’t know everything. And that can be emotionally draining on you. So you need to take time for yourself.

    Whether you like to go and work out, or you like to do arts and crafts, or you just take a nap, whatever you do, just do something for yourself. Because ultimately you have to take care of yourself before you can take
    care of your patients.

    My last tip on surviving the first six months of being a new nurse is to be confident in yourself.

    Even if you don’t know something, just feel confident.Put those shoulders back, be proud, and be confident in yourself. Because you really truly know more than you think you know. And I’m not saying be confident and pretend you know something that you don’t, but be confident in your abilities to be a nurse.

    You can do this.

    When you are more confident in yourself and your abilities, your patients can really sense that and they appreciate that.

    All right guys, thank you so much for watching my video.I hope that these tips helped you guys out, especially if you’re a new nurse or about to be a new nurse.

    Make sure to check out the rest of Nursing.org’s website. They have a lot of great resources and a lot of great information on their website for you guys to help you all out.

    Make sure you head over to my YouTube channel, Ashley Adkins RN, or visit my website, AshleyAdkins.org, to learn more information and see more of my videos.

    Bye guys!

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  • Click here to learn more about how to become a registered nurse.